Tomato-Basil Simmer Sauce

 


12 pounds ripe tomatoes (about 25 tomatoes), peeled*
3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons kosher salt or 4 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cups lightly packed fresh basil leaves, chopped
1 cup lightly packed assorted fresh herbs (such as oregano, thyme, parsley, or
Italian (flat-leaf) parsley), chopped
6 tablespoons lemon juice

Cut peeled tomatoes into chunks and add some of the chunks to the food
processor. Cover and process until chopped. Transfer chopped tomatoes to a 7- to
8-quart nonreactive heavy pot. Repeat chopping remaining tomatoes, in batches,
in the food processor. Add all tomatoes to the pot.

Add brown sugar, salt, vinegar, and black pepper to the tomato mixture. Bring to
boiling. Boil steadily, uncovered, for 70 to 80 minutes, stirring occasionally,
until mixture is reduced to about 11 cups and is desired sauce consistency.
Remove from heat; stir in herbs.

Spoon 1 tablespoon lemon juice into each of six hot, clean pint canning jars.
Ladle sauce into jars with lemon juice, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe the jar
rims; adjust lids. Process filled jars in a boiling-water canner for 35 minutes
(start time when water returns to a full boil). Remove jars; cool on wire racks.
Makes: about 11 cups sauce (6 pints)

Spicy Simmer Sauce: Stir in 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper with the herbs.

Roasted Garlic Simmer Sauce: Stir in 3 tablespoons chopped roasted garlic with
the herbs.

Double Tomato Simmer Sauce: Stir in 1 cup snipped dried tomatoes (not
oil-packed) with the herbs.

Roasted Garlic: Preheat oven to 400°F. Peel away the dry outer layers of skin
from garlic bulbs, leaving skins and cloves intact. Cut off about 1/2 inch from
the pointed top portions, leaving bulbs intact but exposing the individual
cloves. Place the garlic bulbs, cut sides up, in a 1- to 1 1/2-quart casserole.
Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Cover casserole. Bake for 40 to 50
minutes or until garlic is soft. Remove from oven. When garlic is cool enough to
handle, remove garlic cloves from papers by squeezing the bottoms of the bulbs.
Chop roasted garlic.

Parsley Jelly

 

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups boiling water
  • 10 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 2 1/2 cups honey
  • 1/2 (6 fluid ounce) container liquid pectin
  • Green food coloring 2-3 drops for taste

Directions

  1. Make a strong infusion by pouring the boiling water over the parsley. Let stand for 15 minutes. Strain out bits of parsley, and reserve liquid in a glass or stainless steel saucepan.
  2. Stir the honey and vinegar into the parsley water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the pectin, and continue to boil, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Remove from heat, and skim off any foam from the top. Transfer to sterile jars, and seal in a hot water bath.

Bread and Butter Pickles

 

Makes 7 pints

  • 4 quarts cucumbers, sliced (about 15, 6″-8″ cucumbers; leave peels on)
  • 4 medium white onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 quarts ice
  • 1/2 cup pickling salt (regular table salt leaves a sediment in the jars)
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp celery seed
  • 2 Tbsp mustard seeds
  • 5 cups apple cider vinegar

In a large pot (I use my pressure canner), mix cucumbers, onions, salt and ice. Cover with a lid and let sit for 3 hours. Next, drain the mixture well and return to pot. Add sugar, spices, and vinegar; heat until it’s almost boiling, stirring mixture- do not let it get to a boil.

In the mean time, have your jars either steaming in the dishwasher, simmering in a pot of hot water, or sitting in a low heated oven. You’ll need the jars hot before you add the extremely hot pickle mixture to them; otherwise the jars could break.

When the mixture is ready, pour into hot jars, leaving about 1″ headspace, and seal lids. Hot water bath for 10 minutes, just to be safe.

Grape Juice

  Grape Juice

1/3 c. sugar

1 1/3 c. grapes

boiling water

1 Tsp Lemon Juice Bottled

Wash grapes. Put sugar,Lemon JC, and grapes in quart jars. Fill jars with boiling water. Pressure cook jars for 5 min. at 5 lbs.

Bread and Butter Pickles

 

Here’s the recipe:

Makes 7 pints

  • 4 quarts cucumbers, sliced (about 15, 6″-8″ cucumbers; leave peels on)
  • 4 medium white onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 quarts ice
  • 1/2 cup pickling salt (regular table salt leaves a sediment in the jars)
  • 5 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp celery seed
  • 2 Tbsp mustard seeds
  • 5 cups apple cider vinegar

In a large pot (I use my pressure canner), mix cucumbers, onions, salt and ice. Cover with a lid and let sit for 3 hours. Next, drain the mixture well and return to pot. Add sugar, spices, and vinegar; heat until it’s almost boiling, stirring mixture- do not let it get to a boil.

In the mean time, have your jars either steaming in the dishwasher, simmering in a pot of hot water, or sitting in a low heated oven. You’ll need the jars hot before you add the extremely hot pickle mixture to them; otherwise the jars could break.

When the mixture is ready, pour into hot jars, leaving about 1″ headspace, and seal lids. Hot water bath for 10 minutes, just to be safe.

Beef Stew For Canning

 

Yields 14 pints or 7 quarts

  • 4-5 pounds beef stew meat, cut into bite size pieces

  • 1 Tbsp oil

  • 3 quarts cubed and peeled potatoes (about 12 medium)

  • 2 quarts sliced carrots (about 16 small)

  • 3 cups chopped celery (about 5 stalks) (I didn’t have any, so I substituted 2 Tbsp dried celery flakes.)

  • 3 cups chopped onion (about 4 small)

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp salt

  • 1 tsp thyme, garlic, paprika

  • 1/2 tsp pepper

Brown meat in oil. Combine meat, veggies, and seasoning in a very large pot (I actually had to use two pots to hold all of this). Cover with boiling water, and bring back up to a boil. Ladle hot stew into hot jars, leaving 1″ headspace. Tap jars to remove air bubbles, then cover with lid. In a pressure canner, process pints for 1 hour and 15 minutes, quarts for 1 hour and 30 minutes, at 10 pounds of pressure.

Canned Cheese

 

Home canned “soft cheese” has better cooking properties than store bought bottled cheese meant for snack food. It contains no preservatives and is more economical than commercial products for cooking purposes. These instructions yield a product that is similar to “Cheese Whiz”, yet better tasting for a recipe of macaroni and cheese. This simple to do recipe for home canned cheese will keep for 2 years plus.

Ingredients:

1(5oz.)can-evaporated-milk

1T.vinegar

½tsp.salt

1lb.Velveeta-cheese-or-any-processed-cheese

* ½ tsp. dry mustard

Melt milk and cheese in double boiler. Add rest of ingredients and mix well. Fill pint jars about 3/4 full and seal. Place in Boiling Water bath for 10 minutes.

Canned Butter or American Ghee

 

I recommend canning in a pressure canner 25 minutes or keep in fridge.

1. Use any butter that is on sale. (Salted is better; don’t use margarine.) Lesser quality butter requires more shaking (see #5 below), but the results are the same as with the expensive brands.

2. Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

3. While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

4. Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4″ of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

5. Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids “ping,” shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

6. At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

7. Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. Canned butter does not “melt” again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.

A lovely glow seems to emanate from every jar. You will also be glowing with grateful satisfaction while placing this “sunshine in a jar” on your pantry shelves.

Zucchini Pineapple (Faux Pineapple)

Courgette jaune

Image via Wikipedia

Ingredients

  • quarts zucchini, peeled (either shredded or cut into 1/2-inch cubes)
  • 46 ounces unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 1 1/2 cups lemon juice (the bottled kind)
  • 3 cups sugar
  • yellow food coloring

Directions

      Mix zucchini with other ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a boil.

Simmer 20 minutes.

Fill jars with hot mixture and cooking liquid, leaving ½-inch head space.

Adjust lids and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes (add 5 minutes over 1000 feet in elevation, and 10 minutes over 6000 feet).

Be A Food Processor

 

If you have the proper canning equipment and the time, put foods by. You’ll need a pressure cooker to can meats, broths, and low-acid vegetables, but a very large soup pot can be used for making tomato sauces and salsas, jams and jellies, pickles, flavored vinegars and other gourmet treats with bushels of fresh local harvest. Even simply canned fruit in syrups are vastly superior to supermarket brands. No added dyes, preservatives and added salt make canning a healthy activity. Premade pie fillings made with clearjel starches can improve deserts while keeping a budget friendly convenience at hand.

As an alternative to home canned jellies, there are natural products available that make it possible to make your own jelly using fruit juice. Some specially marketed pectin s don’t require processing in a boiling water bath because they are stored in the refrigerator or freezer. These products have their place when preparing small batches of jellies and provide an exceptionally fresh fruit taste. Pectin s of all types may be found in the canning section of your local supermarket.